Organ Harvesting – The Trial Chinese Leaders Fear | China Uncensored

CHINA UNCENSORED

China’s greatest crime is being put on trial! The Independent Tribunal into Forced Organ Harvesting from Prisoners of Conscience in China is exposing how Chinese military hospitals are killing people for their organs, people like Falun Gong practitioners, Christians, Tibetan Buddhists, and Uighur Muslims. At the very same time China is being honored by the World Health Organization as a leader in organ transplants. Trafficking organs can be a big boost for the economy!

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B-52 Bombers Conduct ‘Training ‘Mission’ With Japan Over East China Sea  | Zero Hedge

East China Sea 

Two Boeing B-52 long-range, subsonic, jet-powered strategic bombers recently conducted an “integration training” mission with the U.S. Navy and the Japan Air Self Defense Force (JASDF) over the East China Sea. 
statement issued by the U.S. Pacific Air Force (PACAF) last month indicated that two B-52s departed from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, linked up with McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagles assigned to the Kadena Air Base in Japan. The mission was conducted on March 20. 
“Training missions and patrols of the contested waters are not unheard of, having become a regular exercise by American forces. The US’ use of bombers in the region has been going on for more than 10 years as part of its Continuous Bomber Presence, a mission Washington says is “in support of a free and open Indo-Pacific.”

In response to the U.S. led military exercise, the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAF) conducted an exercise of their own, on March 30, with six Xian H-6 bombers, additional reconnaissance aircraft, and fighter jets, across the Miyako Strait, a waterway which lies between Miyako Island and Okinawa Island. 
The U.S. and Japan have routinely carried out air defense training missions in the East China Sea, home to the Japanese-controlled Senkaku Islands. 


An estimated $5 trillion worth of global trade passes through the South China Sea annually. Beijing has repeatedly stressed that it’s willing to escalate war drills in the region to defend its territory. The threat has mostly be ignored by American forces, who continue to conduct military exercises in some of the world’s most disputed waters. 
Washington and Beijing have frequently unleashed a war of words over the militarization of the South China Sea, where China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines all have competing economic claims.

B-52 Bombers Conduct ‘Training ‘Mission’ With Japan Over East China Sea  | Zero Hedge

How Brexit Plays Into China’s Hands | Bad Brexit Deal | China Uncensored

China Uncensored

Brexit is nigh. And like your standard divorce, Britain splitting up with the European Union is bound to be partly painful. But one country that’s looking forward to spinning all that hurt in its favor is China. That’s because the CCP’s strategy in Europe is all about divide and conquer, and undercutting Europe’s ability to resist Chinese infiltration with a united front. And Huawei 5G might be at the forefront.

Protesters warn of Chinese ‘invasion’ of Philippines – SE Asia – The Jakarta Post

Philippines

Protesters descended on the Chinese embassy in Manila on Tuesday to oppose the Asian superpower’s growing sway in the Philippines and as tensions rise over Beijing’s presence in the disputed South China Sea.

Filipino flag-waving marchers chanted “China out” and brandished a banner saying “Defend our sovereign rights”, referring to Beijing’s expansive claims to the resource-rich waterway.

“The government headed by President (Rodrigo) Duterte is not responding. What China is doing is almost an invasion,” marcher Alex Legaspi, a 53-year-old teacher, told AFP.

While Duterte has largely set aside the once-heated territorial standoff over the sea, tensions have flared since hundreds of Chinese vessels appeared recently near the Manila-held Pag-asa (Thitu) island.

The Philippines called the boats’ presence “illegal” and Duterte has threatened China with possible military action if it touches the island.

However, the president has repeatedly said war with China would be futile and he has no intention of getting into a conflict with the rising power he has courted for trade and investment.

Duterte has been criticised at home as being too eager to grow ties with Beijing, and giving up too much leverage on the South China Sea issue.

Meanwhile, the United States has moved to boost its relationship with long-time ally and former colony the Philippines.

A small group of policemen monitored the protesters, who numbered around 1,000 according to journalists on the scene. The marchers dispersed peacefully after the demonstration.

Protesters also voiced simmering unease over the terms Chinese loans for infrastructure in the Philippines, including a massive dam-building project.

China is poised to loan some $210 million toward the construction of the Kaliwa Dam, a project that has been delayed for years and would fill gaps in the Philippines’ chronic need for infrastructure.

“We cannot allow… China to control Filipinos and the Philippines’ sovereignty,” Wilma Quierrez, 53, member of indigenous rights group told AFP.

“The loan agreement signed by (Chinese President) Xi Jinping and President Duterte will send us into debt trap,” she added.

via Protesters warn of Chinese ‘invasion’ of Philippines – SE Asia – The Jakarta Post

China’s Special Forces To Station In Zimbabwe, Build Secret Underground Base To Protect Natural Resource Claims | Zero Hedge

Zimbabwe

Spotlight Zimbabwe has reported that China is preparing to station elite special forces in Zimbabwe, as Beijing increases military cooperation with Harare, amid concerns that the Asian powerhouse is set to construct a secret underground military base in the country.

The new report comes one year after Spotlight Zimbabwe revealed that China installed next-generation surface-to-air missiles (SAM) in the country, the same ones that are deployed to the South China Sea on Woody Island.

China’s new military base is set to protect its large diamond claims and gold mines across the country, where some of its SAM launchers are already located.

According to a former minister of ex-leader President Robert Mugabe’s administration, China has been planning on sending their special forces to the country since 2014 “to offer technical assistance and support” to the Zimbabwe National Army (ZNA). However, Mugabe called off the plan several years ago, after accusing the Chinese of corruption, and the plunder of natural resources in Marange.

“They (China) have been itching to set a permanent military presence in this country, to protect their vast economic interests here but Mugabe was resisting the overtures,” said the former cabinet minister. “Although the cover argument was around offering technical assistance and support to our armed forces, it later became clear that Mnangagwa had his own agreement and arrangements with China. This infuriated Mugabe, and it was also during the same period Mnangagwa had first traveled to China as vice president, holding high-level meetings which his boss had not fully been briefed on. The incident increased Mugabe’s political mistrust for Mnangagwa, whom he suspected was presenting himself to President Xi Jinping, as the best political actor to secure China’s investments in Zimbabwe after he steps down. The rest is history. Mnangagwa has since invited China back to mine diamonds in Marange, and their special force has received the greenlight from vice president Rtd General, Constatino Chiwenga, to find a station in the country. Now there is every reason to believe that Mugabe’s November 2017 ouster, could have been a result of China viewing his stay in power as a threat to their economic investments, especially after having stripped them of diamond mining rights.”

Zimbabwe has seen billions of dollars of Chinese investments over the last few years, mainly in critical economic sectors of mining, agriculture, and telecommunications. The investments are part of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), an ambitious effort to improve regional economies on a trans-continental scale. It aims to strengthen infrastructure, trade, and investment between China and 65 other countries that collectively account for 30% of global Gross Domestic Product (GDP), 62% of world population and 75% of known global energy reserves.

President Emmerson Mnangagwa said last month that BRI is a significant improvement of the old Silk Road.

“In the past, there was the Silk Road, and that to a greater extent did not embrace the entire continent. Zimbabwe was only lucky to the extent that 800 to 1000 years ago there was trade between the Munhumutapa Kingdom and China when we imported porcelain and silk from here and in turn you got our ivory.

“But today the Road and Belt Initiative has taken everybody on board so that our economies can talk to each other, so that our economies can help each other modernize and mechanize. We are getting connected and benefiting from each other.

“If you look at the current FOCAC meeting, there are 10 issues that we are going to deal with and these issues are really primary issues that show developing countries like Zimbabwe.

“The issue of transportation, the issue of infrastructure development in our countries . . . we believe that with this relationship under FOCAC where the rest of Africa is making conversations with China, and China helping Zimbabwe and Africa to go up. And when that happens it creates the integration of marketing in China and Africa so we are happy that we are part of this global vision,” he said.

China has indicated that it will invest in Africa with the Agenda 2063 of the African Union, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development of the United Nations, as well as the development strategies of individual African countries.

However, in Zimbabwe’s case, Chinese BRI investments have been followed by a permanent military presence. Now, allegedly, a secret underground military base for special forces is set to be constructed, a move that will certainly anger Washington.

via China’s Special Forces To Station In Zimbab

we, Build Secret Underground Base To Protect Natural Resource Claims | Zero Hedge

China says it wants to eliminate bitcoin mining – Reuters

SHANGHAI

(Reuters) – China’s state planner wants to ban bitcoin mining, according to a draft list of industrial activities the agency is seeking to stop in a sign of growing government pressure on the cryptocurrency sector.

The National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) said on Monday it was seeking public opinions on a revised list of industries it wants to encourage, restrict or eliminate. The list was first published in 2011.

The draft for a revised list added cryptocurrency mining, including that of bitcoin, to over 450 activities the NDRC said should be phased out as they did not adhere to relevant laws and regulations, were unsafe, wasted resources or polluted the environment.

Ie If the government cant control it and poses a threat to the existing power structure then it should be banned -Ed

It did not stipulate a target date or plan for how to eliminate bitcoin mining, meaning that such activities should be phased out immediately, the document said. The public has have until May 7 to comment on the draft.

The only currency with any kind of track record over the long term is Gold. Government oppression, state sponsored money debasement, world wars, you name it gold is still valued today as it has no counter party risk and cant be synthesized in a Lab unlike say diamonds.. If you can hold onto it its yours. -ed 

State-owned newspaper Securities Times said on Tuesday that the draft list “distinctly reflects the attitude of the country’s industrial policy” toward the cryptocurrency industry.

Cryptocurrency Sector

The cryptocurrency sector has been under heavy scrutiny in China since 2017, when regulators started to ban initial coin offerings and shut local cryptocurrency trading exchanges.

China also began to limit cryptocurrency mining, forcing many firms – among them some of the world’s largest – to find bases elsewhere.

Chinese companies are also among the biggest manufacturers of bitcoin mining gear. Reuters reported last year that at least three were looking to raise billions of dollars with initial public offerings in Hong Kong. But at least one, Canaan Inc, let its application lapse.

via China says it wants to eliminate bitcoin mining – Reuters

Title Photo by Dmitry Moraine on Unsplash

Nine Hong Kong pro-democracy activists found guilty over 2014 protests

HONG KONG

(Reuters) – A Hong Kong court found leaders of the 2014 “Occupy” civil disobedience movement guilty on Tuesday of public nuisance charges during the mass protests, in a landmark verdict that comes as the China-ruled city’s freedoms come under strain.

Scores of supporters clapped in support of the nine defendants including a law professor, two lawmakers and former student activists, after the judge delivered his verdict following a trial that critics say highlights shrinking political freedoms in the former British colony.

Three of the defendants accused of playing a leading role in planning and mobilising supporters during the 79-day street occupations in 2014 – Benny Tai, 54; Chan Kin-man, 60; and retired pastor Chu Yiu-ming, 75; were found guilty of conspiracy to commit public nuisance.

Tai and Chan were also found guilty of incitement to commit public nuisance. They appeared calm after the verdict was delivered, and Chan bowed to supporters, applauding them outside the court. The trio had pleaded not guilty to all charges, which each carry a maximum seven years jail.

Tai, speaking to Reuters earlier, said they would continue the struggle for full democracy.

“The reason that we committed civil disobedience is because we want justice for Hong Kong people.”

In a summary of his judgement, Justice Johnny Chan noted that while the concept of civil disobedience is “recognized in Hong Kong”, it wasn’t a defense to a criminal charge.

“The offence of conspiracy to cause a public nuisance does not have the undesirable effect of curtailing or suppressing civil disobedience at its formation stage or suppressing human rights as the defendants contended,” the summary read.

Since the city returned from British to Chinese rule in 1997, critics say China has reneged on its commitment to maintain Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy and freedoms under a co-called “one country, two systems” arrangement.

In the nearly five years since the Occupy protests, democracy activists, diplomats and business leaders have expressed grave concerns over what they say is Beijing’s tightening grip on the city’s freedoms.or 79 straight days in late 2014, in one of the boldest populist

“NAIVE”

The nine defendants were accused of inciting and mobilizing protesters during the demonstrations that sought to pressure Beijing to allow full democracy.

Hundreds of thousands of people blocked major roads in several parts of the global financial hub for 79 straight days in late 2014, in one of the boldest populist challenges against Beijing in decades.

The demonstrators were finally cleared away by police, having won no democratic concessions from the government.

David Leung, the director of public prosecutions, had earlier argued that Tai, Chan and Chu were the main conspirators who had begun planning the protests a year in advance. He also said the protests had caused “unreasonable” public disruptions over nearly three months.

A public opinion poll by the Chinese University of Hong Kong that was cited in court found that of some 1,200 protesters polled during the demonstrations, 87 percent said they had participated to “protect Hong Kong’s liberty”.

The 268 page judgment noted, however, that: “it is naive to suggest that a concession to introduce the form of universal suffrage … could be made by the government overnight with a click of the fingers, it is equally naive to suggest a mass protest of tens of thousands of people could be dispersed overnight even if a positive response were to come from the authorities.”

Reporting by James Pomfret and Jessie Pang; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore

Beijing targeted writers over Australia secret inquiry: report – The Jakarta Post

China

Beijing agents pressured two Chinese-Australian authors to provide information about a secret Canberra inquiry into Chinese meddling in domestic politics, local media reported Monday.

Yang Jun, a novelist and democracy advocate, and Feng Chongyi, a Sydney-based university professor and former newspaper publisher, were reportedly interrogated over the classified probe.

The pair are both friends of John Garnaut, a former journalist who was heading up the inquiry.

Relations between the two nations have been fraught in recent times over fears of Chinese interference, and as Beijing flexes its muscle in the Pacific islands which Canberra views as its backyard.

A joint investigation published Monday by The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and national broadcaster ABC found China had waged an intelligence operation to gain details of the probe ordered in 2016 by then-Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Yang, an Australian citizen whose pen name is Yang Hengjun, has been detained in China since travelling there in January, accused of endangering state security.

Monday’s report coincided with a plea from his wife for Australia to do more to secure his release.

Australian media have reported that Yang was a former Chinese diplomat, although that has been denied by Beijing.

The ABC report said Chinese agents had previously intercepted and questioned Yang in Sydney in 2018 when he was on his way to meet with Garnaut.

Garnaut told the ABC that a Chinese official asked Yang “about me… what I was doing, what I was working on”.

Yang’s wife, Xiaoliang Yuan, has been banned from leaving China but she spoke to the ABC from Shanghai to urge Australia to help free her husband.

“I think at least the Australian government officials should care for its citizens’ well being when they are overseas, should show their concern,” she was quoted as saying.

Feng, a permanent Australian resident, told the ABC he was questioned about Garnaut when he was detained for several days during a trip to China in 2017.

“They knew a lot about him (Garnaut). During the interrogation, they did not hide that they were angry with him,” Feng said.

Andrew Hastie — who chairs Canberra’s intelligence and security committee — told the ABC the government has had “multiple briefings” from domestic intelligence agency ASIO and other agencies that “foreign interference is being conducted in Australia at an unprecedented level”.

“There are several authoritarian states who are involved in foreign influence across the globe. But in Australia the Chinese Communist Party is probably the most active,” he added.

“China is seeking to influence our elites, particularly our political and business elites, in order to achieve their strategic objectives.”

The inquiry led Australia to pass sweeping reforms to espionage and foreign interference laws, with China singled out as a focus of concern.

via Beijing targeted writers over Australia secret inquiry: report – World – The Jakarta Post

Some might say that a small proportion of the Australian “Elites” would actually prefer the authoritarian model of Chinese governance..  *cough*

China Grounds Boeing 787s After GPS ‘Y2K” Bug Strikes | Zero Hedge

Just when you thought it was safe to buy Boeing stock… because, hell, what more could go wrong? Well, this…

Late last week we warned of this weekend’s ‘Y2K’-moment for GPS systems. Here’s what’s going on…

The rollover issue itself is caused by the fact that GPS systems count weeks using a ten-bit parameter. This means they start counting at week zero and reset when they hit week 1,024.

The first count (or “GPS epoch”) started on January 6th, 1980, and the first reset took place on August 21st, 1999. That means the next one is due April 6th this year. (source)

Some experts thought that the risk is negligible, while others thought this is something to which we should pay strict attention.

Carl “Bear” Bussjaeger, a New Hampshire-based science-fiction writer, Air Force veteran and former telecommunications network technician, reached out to us via Twitter to say that the link between GPS timing and telecom networks is not direct.

“Networks don’t time off GPS,” Bussjaeger said in a tweet. “They time off internal/master station clocks. Those clocks periodically synchronize off GPS.”

In a further conversation, Bussjaeger told us he had monitored the 1999 GPS epoch rollover as part of his telecoms job, and that there was “not so much as a bit error” on the network clocks.

“The clocks used in telecoms can free-run for days,” he said. “They’re very stable. GPS timing is really just a backup to the backup.”

During an epoch rollover, Bussjaeger said, “geolocation could glitch, but only momentarily, if at all. A GPS unit might have to reacquire the birds [satellites] to determine its location, but it’s no worse than turning on a unit and waiting for it to acquire [the satellite signal] in the first place.”

“Twenty years ago, we didn’t have a problem,” he added. “I rather expect that clocks are better, more stable now.” (source)

And rightly, not everyone sees it as a non-event.

“I would say it’s legitimate to be concerned,” Brad Parkinson, the retired Air Force colonel and Stanford University professor who was the lead architect of GPS, told San Francisco’s KPIX-TVin an interview published April 2.

“GPS affects everything we do,” he said. “It affects timing, banking, cell towers, airplanes, ships, passengers in cars … everything that we can imagine.”

“If you’re driving your car and it were to suddenly say you’re in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, be very suspicious,” he told KPIX-TV. (source)

So, basically, the vibe we got from this is that nobody really knew what will happen, or even if anything will happen.

Well, now we know, something has happened.

China Aviation Review reports that: “Multiple Boeing 787s in China experienced GPS 20 years rollover issue. Some aircrafts have to be grounded waiting for an update.”

via China Grounds Boeing 787s After GPS ‘Y2K” Bug Strikes | Zero Hedge

China-U.S. Trade Pact Will Happen and Be Good for Exporters, Kevin Rudd

Bloomberg Interviews Kevin Rudd on International Trade

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, president of the Asia Society Policy Institute, discusses the outlook for U.S.-China trade negotiations. He speaks with Bloomberg’s David Westin on “Bloomberg Markets: Balance of Power.”

Philippines’ Duterte warns China to back off disputed island – CNA – AFP

rodrigo duterte on stage
Photo by Denniz Futalan on Pexels.com

MANILA: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has warned Beijing to back off from a disputed island in the South China Sea, warning of possible military action if China “touches” it amid rising tensions over the key waterway.

Duterte, aiming to attract trade and investment from the Asian superpower, has mostly withheld his early criticism of Beijing’s expansive claims to the sea – a point of regional contention because trillions of dollars of goods pass through it.

But as the Philippine military warned this week that hundreds of Chinese coast guard and fishing vessels had “swarmed” the Manila-held Pag-asa island, also known as Thitu, the Philippine president spoke out late Thursday.

“I will not plead or beg, but I am just telling you that lay off the Pag-asa because I have soldiers there,” Duterte said in speech to prosecutors.

“If you touch it, that’s another story. Then I will tell my soldiers ‘prepare for suicide missions’.”

Duterte has repeatedly said war with China would be futile and that the Philippines would lose and suffer heavily in the process.

His words came after his Department of Foreign Affairs issued a statement calling the Chinese ships’ presence an “illegal” violation of Philippine sovereignty.

China, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, Taiwan and Vietnam have all staked claims to various islands and reefs as well as waterways in the sea, with rich petroleum reserves thought to sit deep beneath the waters.

In a major victory for Manila, an international maritime tribunal ruled early in Duterte’s presidency in 2016 that China’s claims to the area have no legal basis.

However, he has largely set aside that ruling and backed off on their once tense territorial dispute over the sea.

He has been criticised at home for taking too soft a stance on China and getting little of the billions of dollars in investment promised by Chinese President Xi Jinping.

For its part, Beijing has downplayed the rising tension over Pag-asa, saying on Thursday that both sides had “exchanged views frankly, amicably and constructively” on the issue.

The United States, long-time Philippines ally and former colonial master, has moved to oppose any Chinese expansion in the sea.

For the first time, the US said in March that it would come to Manila’s aid in case of an “armed attack” in the South China Sea.

The US navy has also forcefully asserted its right to freedom of navigation in the area, repeatedly sailing close to the man-made islands and drawing Chinese protests.

 

https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/philippines–duterte-warns-china-to-back-off-disputed-island-11414992

Food Crisis 2019: An Outbreak Of African Swine Fever Is Devastating The Global Pig Population, And Pork Prices Are Skyrocketing – End Of The American Dream

 

China raises and consumes far more pigs than anyone else in the world, and it is also the epicenter of this crisis.

At this point we don’t know exactly how many pigs that they have lost, but we have some numbers that at least give us an idea.  For example, the Chinese government admitted that China’s pig herd was 13 percent smaller in January compared to a year earlier…

China’s pig herd fell 13 percent in January compared with the same month a year earlier, while the number of breeding sows was down 15 percent from the previous year, according to data from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs.

China once had a population of 430 million pigs, and taking 13 percent of that number would give us a total of 55.9 million pigs that have been lost.

But there have also been allegations of a “cover-up”, and some believe that the true number of pigs that have been lost is closer to 100 million.

In either case, we are talking about potentially apocalyptic losses.

And these losses are really starting to move global pork prices.  Over the last two weeks alone, we have witnessed a 20 percent increase

Pork prices have been creeping higher since February, as trading companies realized that there is less stock of hogs and market supply will become even less.

“(The) pork price increased to 14.55 Yuan (USD$2.17) per kilogram last week, compared to 12.11 Yuan (USD$1.80) two or three weeks ago — (price) increased 20% in two weeks,” said Jun Wang from China Agricultural University.

U.S. hog prices have surged the past few weeks on signs that Chinese buyers have turned to the U.S. to make up for the dwindling of China’s pig herds because of African swine fever (ASF), said a Wall Street Journal (WSJ) article on March 27. U.S. hog futures prices have rocketed nearly 50% higher in the past month, as expectations rose that China would use American imports to fulfill its pork supply needs.

marissa-daeger-1387414-unsplash.jpg

Photo by Marissa Daeger on Unsplash

All over the world, anything with pork in it is going to start costing a lot more.  And when you couple this with all of the other disasters that have hit global food production in recent months, the truth is that we are potentially facing a major global food crisis later in 2019.

And remember, this outbreak of African Swine Fever is far from over.  In fact, fresh outbreaks continue to come in from all over China

Reports of another outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) in China’s Hubei province in the central part of the country were confirmed on March 31.

According to China’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, all 83 pigs on one farm were infected with the disease, which killed 73 of them. At the second 142-head pig farm, eight hogs were infected and five died, the statement said.

In Vietnam, the prime minister is officially freaking out as this disease pops up in various areas around his nation…

Vietnam’s prime minister has called for “drastic measures” to fight the spread of African swine fever in the Southeast Asian country, state media reported on Tuesday.

The highly contagious disease, which is incurable in pigs but harmless to humans, has spread rapidly across neighboring China since August, and has been found in seven areas in Vietnam, the state-run Vietnam News Service reported.

95 million people live in Vietnam, and pork accounts for approximately three-quarters of all meat consumption in that country.

If a large percentage of the pigs are suddenly wiped out, that is going to cause massive problems.

African Swine Fever is also ripping through pig herds in Cambodia

According to the Director General , Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries , General Directorate of Animal Health and Production (GDAHP), Phnom Penh, Cambodia, an ASF outbreak has been reported in backyard pigs in Rattanakiri province in northeast Cambodia, which borders Vietnam.

Four hundred of the 500 pigs on the farm died and the remaining killed and properly disposed.

Global food prices are never going to be lower than they are at this moment, and now is the time to get prepared for more unstable times ahead.  Here in the U.S., the recent flooding is going to have an enormous impact on U.S. agricultural production this year.  For much more on this, please see my recent article entitled ‘“As Many As A Million Calves Lost In Nebraska” – Beef Prices In The U.S. To Escalate Dramatically In The Coming Months’.

Personally, I don’t know why anyone would even want to eat pigs.  Pork consumption is a highway to cancer, heart disease and diabetes.  But the reality of the matter is that pigs are the main source of meat for a very large percentage of the global population, and now we have an outbreak that is playing havoc with the global pig population.

Let’s keep a very close eye on this story, because it could have very serious ramifications for all of us in the months ahead.

Hog futures are rising even faster.  Over the past month, they have gone up nearly 50 percent

via Food Crisis 2019: An Outbreak Of African Swine Fever Is Devastating The Global Pig Population, And Pork Prices Are Skyrocketing – End Of The American Dream

Title Photo by Marissa Daeger on Unsplash

Shenzhen-listed textile firm’s Indonesia investment fuels hopes of silver lining in US-China trade war | South China Morning Post

  • Jiangsu Lianfa Textile is pumping at least US$350 million in a Central Java factory, sparking optimism that Chinese firms will choose Indonesia as they shift their production centres to avoid trade tariffs
  • Textile exports contributed US$13.8 billion last year, and the government is aiming to grow exports to US$15 billion for the US, Japanese and European markets

A China company’s bid to set up a textile manufacturing plant in Indonesia’s Central Java province is raising hopes the Southeast Asian country can benefit from Chinese firms seeking to shift their production centres amid the ongoing US-China trade war.
Jiangsu Lianfa Textile, listed on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange, will launch its factory next year with an investment of between 5 and 6 trillion rupiah (US$350 million and US$422 million), said Ade Sudrajat, chairman of the Indonesian Textile Association (API).

The factory will produce yarn for shirt-making, reducing the cost of yarn imports by US$1 billion for Indonesian shirtmakers and helping them produce final goods such as fabrics and shirts more speedily for the US market, he said.

“There isn’t a single Chinese investor that has pumped money into Indonesia in the last one to two year … and we hope this planned shift by the Chinese textile company is a sign that more will come to Indonesia,” Sudrajat said. “Our buyers in the US will benefit because the shipment processes for materials will be shorter and faster.”

Textile exports contributed US$13.8 billion last year, or about 2 per cent of Indonesia’s GDP, and the Industry Ministry said close to 3 million new jobs were created. Its aim is to grow textiles exports this year to US$15 billion for the US, Japanese and European markets.

Sudrajat said he spoke with Jiangsu Lianfa officials last year, and talks centred on the challenges posed by Southeast Asia’s largest economy’s complicated industrial and labour regulations, compared to other lower-cost manufacturing hubs in neighbours Malaysia and Vietnam.

Among other things, companies in Indonesia must pay a high minimum wage and commit to high severance payments. Lagging infrastructure, such as poor roads and power shortages, have turned away investors.

Indonesia wants to increase its slumping exports amid a record trade deficit, and is seeking to sign trade pacts to look for new markets, Bloomberg reported last month. It recently signed a comprehensive

economic partnership

with Australia that removed duties on some of its exports.

Industry Minister Airlangga Hartarto told local media in January that several textile and shoemaking companies were considering moving operations from China to Indonesia to avoid trade tariffs. The size of Chinese investments last year – US$2.4 billion – ranked third behind those from Singapore and Japan, according to the Indonesia’s Investment Coordinating Board in February.

Indonesia had about US$27 billion worth of foreign investments last year.

PT Bank Permata economist Josua Pardede urged the government to smoothen the path for domestic and international investors to grow Indonesia’s textile industry, which has been prioritised as a key sector.

“The government should capitalise on the US-China trade war and urge investors to relocate their plants, so that Indonesia can sell more products to overseas markets,” Pardede said.

 

photo-1517840545241-b491010a8af4

A China company’s bid to set up a textile manufacturing plant in Indonesia’s Central Java province is raising hopes the Southeast Asian country can benefit from Chinese firms seeking to shift their production centres amid the ongoing US-China trade war

Jiangsu Lianfa Textile, listed on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange, will launch its factory next year with an investment of between 5 and 6 trillion rupiah (US$350 million and US$422 million), said Ade Sudrajat, chairman of the Indonesian Textile Association (API).

The factory will produce yarn for shirt-making, reducing the cost of yarn imports by US$1 billion for Indonesian shirtmakers and helping them produce final goods such as fabrics and shirts more speedily for the US market, he said.

“There isn’t a single Chinese investor that has pumped money into Indonesia in the last one to two year … and we hope this planned shift by the Chinese textile company is a sign that more will come to Indonesia,” Sudrajat said. “Our buyers in the US will benefit because the shipment processes for materials will be shorter and faster.”

Textile exports contributed US$13.8 billion last year, or about 2 per cent of Indonesia’s GDP. Textile exports contributed US$13.8 billion last year, or about 2 per cent of Indonesia’s GDP, and the Industry Ministry said close to 3 million new jobs were created. Its aim is to grow textiles exports this year to US$15 billion for the US, Japanese and European markets.

Sudrajat said he spoke with Jiangsu Lianfa officials last year, and talks centred on the challenges posed by Southeast Asia’s largest economy’s complicated industrial and labour regulations, compared to other lower-cost manufacturing hubs in neighbours Malaysia and Vietnam.

Among other things, companies in Indonesia must pay a high minimum wage and commit to high severance payments. Lagging infrastructure, such as poor roads and power shortages, have turned away investors.

Trade war means it’s ‘too soon to predict’ regional manufacturing boom

Indonesia wants to increase its slumping exports amid a record trade deficit, and is seeking to sign trade pacts to look for new markets, Bloomberg reported last month. It recently signed a comprehensive

economic partnershipwith Australia that removed duties on some of its exports.

Industry Minister Airlangga Hartarto told local media in January that several textile and shoemaking companies were considering moving operations from China to Indonesia to avoid trade tariffs. The size of Chinese investments last year – US$2.4 billion – ranked third behind those from Singapore and Japan, according to the Indonesia’s Investment Coordinating Board in February.

Indonesia had about US$27 billion worth of foreign investments last year.

Indonesia’s textile industry has been prioritised as a key sector.PT Bank Permata economist Josua Pardede urged the government to smoothen the path for domestic and international investors to grow Indonesia’s textile industry, which has been prioritised as a key sector.

“The government should capitalize on the US-China trade war and urge investors to relocate their plants, so that Indonesia can sell more products to overseas markets,” Pardede said.

China and the US have started a fresh round of talks to end the

trade war but it is unclear how much of the US tariffs – currently imposed on US$250 billion worth of Chinese goods such as chemical products and textiles – will be eliminated.

Jiangsu Lianfa’s factory in Kendal will be in an industrial estate jointly set up by Indonesia’s PT Jababeka, an Indonesian industrial estate operator, and Singapore’s Sembcorp Development.

Philippines says presence of Chinese vessels in disputed waters is illegal

MANILA (Reuters) – The presence of hundreds of Chinese boats near an island occupied by Manila in the disputed South China Sea is illegal and a clear violation of Philippine sovereignty, the country’s foreign ministry said on Thursday.

“Such actions when not repudiated by the Chinese government are deemed to have been adopted by it,” the Department of Foreign Affairs said in a statement, days after the Philippines said it had lodged a diplomatic protest over the vessels.

The presence of the vessels in the vicinity of Thitu island for sustained and recurring periods raised questions about their intent and concerns over their role “in support of coercive objectives,” the ministry added.

Military data shows the Philippines has monitored more than 200 Chinese boats near Thitu, or Pagasa, as it is known locally, from January to March this year.

Besides the Philippines, Brunei, China, Malaysia, Taiwan and Vietnam have competing claims of sovereignty in the busy waterway, a conduit for goods in excess of $3.4 trillion every year.